Lighted vs Lit

Writing Tip 331: “Lighted” vs. “Lit”

If your buddy is “lit,” he’s either drunk or he’s wearing a light-up Christmas sweater. If he’s “lighted,” I suppose you know intoxication is out of the question, but is there a difference otherwise? Should you be worried about flairs of flame? The difference between “lighted” and “lit” is a question that comes up fairly […]

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“Satire” vs. “Satyr” in the woods

Writing Tip 330: “Satire” vs. “Satyr”

Witty satire can be many things—ridiculous, hilarious, poignant, and even brutal—but the one thing it’s not is a half-man, half-horse creature of the wood. There is no alternate spelling of “satire” that makes it cleverer or more in line with its roots. You might be able to spell “theater” as “theatre” in the English language, […]

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"Pleaded" vs. "Pled"

Writing Tip 329: “Pleaded” vs. “Pled”

Are you guilty of this communication faux pas? Well, before you take any plea deals, let’s chat about “plead” vs. “pled.” Do you know which one is correct? Yesterday, perhaps, you pleaded or pled guilty to not knowing the answer. Today, though, it’s time for that to change.

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"Oldest" vs. "Eldest"

Writing Tip 328: “Oldest” vs. “Eldest”

You know you’ve wondered about this. What on earth is the difference between “oldest” and “eldest”? Don’t they mean the same thing? Is this some ye old colonial spelling—like “ye” instead of “the”–that for some grammar-forsaken reason just refuses to fade into the linguistic history books? The answer is simpler than you realize.

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Hank vs Hunk

Writing Tip 327: “Hank” vs. “Hunk”

Just when you think I’m going to be writing this tip about a guy named Hank who may or may not be a dreamy hunk, think again. There are two words that mean a section of something, and these two words are “hank” and “hunk”; however, there’s a big difference between their two meanings. And […]

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“now a days” vs. “nowadays” - dumbfounded monkeys

Writing Tip 326: “Now a Days” vs. “Nowadays” vs. “Nowdays”

Sometimes, when it comes to spelling, we might feel like we’re in a daze, especially when it comes to words that we hear said more than we see written. If you were writing this phrase in the fourteenth century—if you were lucky enough to know how to read or write in that era—you would have […]

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Writing Tip 325: Not to “Mix” or “Mince” Words

Writing Tip 325: Not to “Mix” or “Mince” Words

When it comes to the English language, it’s easy to get things mixed up, but this time, I’m asking you to “mince” it up. Why, you ask? No, I’m not making mincemeat pies, nor am I apprenticing with a butcher. I say this because there is a difference between “mixing words” and “mincing words,” and […]

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